CDC: Progress in HIV Prevention Has Stalled in America

Atlanta, GA–The dramatic decline in annual HIV infections has stopped and new infections have stabilized in recent years, according to a CDC report published today.

The report provides the most recent data on HIV trends in America from 2010 to 2016. It shows that after about five years of substantial declines, the number of HIV infections began to level off in 2013 at about 39,000 infections per year.

In addition to the overall trend, the new report examines HIV infections among multiple subgroups. Data indicate that annual HIV infections declined in some populations, but increased in others.

CDC estimates that from 2010 to 2016, annual HIV infections remained stable among gay and bisexual men, who continue to account for the largest portion (about 70 percent) of new infections.

However, trends varied by race/ethnicity and age.  By race/ethnicity, infections remained stable among black gay and bisexual men; increased 30 percent among Latino gay and bisexual men; and decreased 16 percent among white gay and bisexual men.

By race/ethnicity and age, infections decreased more than 30 percent among black gay and bisexual males ages 13 to 24; remained stable among Latino gay and bisexual males ages 13 to 24; and increased about 65 percent among both black and Latino gay and bisexual males ages 25 to 34.

Decreased about 17 percent among heterosexual men and women combined, including a 15 percent decrease among heterosexual African American women.

Decreased 30 percent among people who inject drugs, but appear to have stabilized in more recent years.

CDC estimates that the decline in HIV infections has plateaued because effective HIV prevention and treatment are not adequately reaching those who could most benefit from them. These gaps remain particularly troublesome in rural areas and in the South and among disproportionately affected populations like African-Americans and Latinos.

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